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Claudius II Gothicus 268-270AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coins for Sale Online

Buy ancient coins of Claudius II Gothicus, or conqueror of the Goths from circa 268-270 A.D. Read his biography and see authentic coins available for sale online from a trusted ancient coin seller on eBay. Claudius II conquered the Goths and was tough soldier-emperor of non-aristocratic birth that helped bring the empire back from the Crisis of the Third Century. The reverses on coins of this emperor are numerous and very interesting. He also had a brother Quintillus whom seized power for a little while after his death of small pox in 270 A.D. Buy coins of this emperor today from a trusted ancient coin dealer, enthusiast and numismatic expert, Ilya Zlobin today. Every coin comes with it's own custom-made, unique certificate of authenticity $50-$100 value, absolutely free, a lifetime guarantee of authenticity, professional research photograph and history. With the service, COA, selection and much more make this by far the best value for buying coins online!

 
 
Example of Authentic Ancient Coin of:

Claudius II - Roman Emperor: 268-270 A.D.
 Billon Antoninianus Antioch mint. 268 A.D.
Reference: RIC 214. Cohen 183. Sear 5 11353.
IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right.
 NEPTVN AVG, Nude Neptune standing left with dolphin and trident.

Neptune (Latin: Neptūnus) is the god of water and the sea in Roman mythology, a brother of Jupiter and Pluto. He is analogous with but not identical to the god Poseidon of Greek mythology. The Roman conception of Neptune owed a great deal to the Etruscan god Nethuns.[2]

For a time he was paired with Salacia, the goddess of the salt water. [3] At an early date (899 BC) he was identified with Poseidon, when the Sibylline books ordered a lectisternium in his honour (Livy v. 13). [4] In the earlier times it was the god Portunes or Fortunus who was thanked for naval victories, but Neptune supplanted him in this role by at least the first century BC when Sextus Pompeius called himself "son of Neptune."[5] Neptune is associated as well with fresh water, as opposed to Oceanus, god of the world-ocean. Like Poseidon, Neptune was also worshipped by the Romans as a god of horses, under the name "Neptune Equester," patron of horse-racing.[6] The planet Neptune was named after the god, as its deep blue gas clouds gave early astronomers the impression of great oceans.

 

Marcus Aurelius Claudius (May 10, 213 - January, 270), often referred to as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was a Roman Emperor. He ruled the Roman Empire for less than two years (268 - 270), but during that brief time he managed to obtain some successes. He was later given divine status.

 Life

 Origin and rise to power

Claudius' origin is uncertain. He was either from Sirmium (Syrmia; in Pannonia Inferior) or from Naissus Dardania (in Moesia Superior); both areas are located in Serbia.

Claudius was the commander of the Roman army that decisively defeated the Goths at the Battle of Naissus in September 268; in the same month, he attained the throne, amid charges, never proven, that he murdered his predecessor Gallienus. However, he soon proved to be less than bloodthirsty, as he asked the Roman Senate to spare the lives of Gallienus' family and supporters. He was less magnanimous toward Rome's enemies, however, and it was to this that he owed his popularity.

Claudius, like Maximinus Thrax before him, was of barbarian birth. After an interlude of failed aristocratic Roman emperors since Maximinus's death, Claudius was the first in a series of tough soldier-emperors who would eventually restore the Empire from the Crisis of the third century.

 Claudius as emperor

At the time of his accession, the Roman Empire was in serious danger from several incursions, both within and outside its borders. The most pressing of these was an invasion of Illyricum and Pannonia by the Goths. Not long after being named emperor (or just prior to Gallienus' death, depending on the source), he won his greatest victory, and one of the greatest in the history of Roman arms.

The Roman Empire in 268 A.D

At the Battle of Naissus, Claudius and his legions routed a huge Gothic army. Together with his cavalry commander, the future Emperor Aurelian, the Romans took thousands of prisoners, destroyed the Gothic cavalry as a force and stormed their laager (a circular alignment of wagons long favored by the Goths). The victory earned Claudius his surname of "Gothicus" (conqueror of the Goths), and that is how he is known to this day. More importantly, the Goths were soon driven back across the Danube River, and a century passed before they again posed a serious threat to the empire.

While this was going on, the Germanic tribe known as the Alamanni had crossed the Alps and attacked the empire. Claudius responded quickly, routing the Alamanni at the Battle of Lake Benacus in the late fall of 268, a few months after the battle of Naissus. He then turned on the Gallic Empire, ruled by a pretender for the past fifteen years and encompassing Britain, Gaul, and the Iberian Peninsula. He won several victories and soon regained control of Spain and the Rhone river valley of Gaul. This set the stage for the ultimate destruction of the Gallic Empire under Aurelian.

However, Claudius did not live long enough to fulfill his goal of reuniting all the lost territories of the empire. Late in 269 he was preparing to go to war against the Vandals, who were raiding in Pannonia. However, he fell victim to the Plague of Cyprian (possibly smallpox), and died early in January 270. Before his death, he is thought to have named Aurelian as his successor, although Claudius' brother Quintillus briefly seized power.

The Senate immediately deified Claudius as "Divus Claudius Gothicus".

 Links to Constantinian dynasty

The Historia Augusta reports Claudius and Quintillus having another brother named Crispus and through him a niece. Said niece Claudia reportedly married Eutropius and was mother to Constantius Chlorus. Historians however suspect this account to be a genealogical fabrication intended to link Constantine I's family to that of a well-respected emperor.

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